Edinburgh Research Explorer

Dr Hugh Rabagliati

Chancellor's Fellow - Reader

Phone: 0131 650 3454

Education / Academic qualification

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), New York University
Shifting senses in semantic development

Research Interests

Language provides a code for learning and teaching new and complex ideas. I study the mental representations and mechanisms that we use to translate from concepts and ideas to words and sentences. My focus is on how these abilities develop, and how they break down in neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly schizophernia and autism.

Biography

Language provides a code for learning and teaching new and complex ideas. I study the mental representations and mechanisms that we use to translate between concepts, words and sentences. My focus is on how these abilities develop, and how they break down in neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly schizophrenia and autism.

I took a BA in psychology at Oxford, before moving to New York University to study for a PhD in psychology and linguistics with Gary Marcus and Liina Pylkkänen. I was a postdoc at Harvard with Jesse Snedeker and Gina Kuperberg, where I began my work on language processing in psychosis and other neurodevelopmental disorders. I arrived in Edinburgh in 2013.

Websites

Visiting and Research Positions

2013- present - Chancellors Fellow, Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh

Qualifications

2010 -PhD Psychology, New York University 

2004 - B.A Experimental Psychology, Worcester College, University of Oxford

Research activities & awards

  1. Semantic Composition: The role of temporal binding.

    Activity: External academic engagementInvited talk

  2. Bricks and mortars for building meanings

    Activity: External academic engagementInvited talk

  3. Error and expectation in children's language learning

    Activity: External academic engagementInvited talk

View all (56) »

Research projects

  1. Expectation-driven language learning

    Project: Funded ProjectResearch

  2. The Development of Lexical Flexibility

    Project: Funded ProjectResearch

  3. The evolution of linguistic complexity

    Project: Funded ProjectResearch

View all (9) »

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