Prof Cabrelli and Dr Skountridaki on the benefits of home working

Press/Media: Expert Comment

Description

Opinion piece by University of Edinburgh academics evaluates the benefits of home-based working 

  

In an op-ed article published by The Times on Wednesday 24 March 2021, David Cabrelli of Edinburgh Law School and Lila Skountridaki of the Business School give their views on home-based working (HBW) and whether this practice will continue post-lockdown as well as who will be likely to benefit from the costs savings and productivity gains arising from HBW. 

One year on from the start of the first Covid lockdown which saw many jobs become home-based, workplaces are beginning to reflect and look forward to how remote working can continue to be incorporated into a hybrid work schedule. With fewer people expected to be spending five days a week in offices, who would benefit from these long-term changes? Will employers monopolise the absorption of them, or will they be passed to workers? 

The Times article titled “Home working makes Scots healthier” highlights some of the financial, health and practicality benefits that working from home can have for both the employer and employee, giving examples such as Scots workers being less likely to take a day off sick whilst working from home, and therefore being more productive. The article finds that although there is still a need for offices for social interaction and mental wellbeing, going forward it is likely that they will be used by fewer people on a full-time basis. 

 

The opinions of David Cabrelli and Lila Skountridaki help to create a balanced evaluation of the pros and cons to HBW, and question where any financial gains of a remote workforce should be best placed within the organisationIn the article, David Cabrelli warns that “employees may face higher costs in utility bills if they work from home all the time” and counters this with a note that this could be “partially offset by a reduction in other costs such as commuting, work clothing and eating out.” 

Period24 Mar 2021

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleHome working makes Scots healthier
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletThe Times
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date24/03/21
    DescriptionOpinion piece by University of Edinburgh academics evaluates the benefits of home-based working

    In an op-ed article published by The Times on Wednesday 24 March 2021, David Cabrelli of Edinburgh Law School and Lila Skountridaki of the Business School give their views on home-based working (HBW) and whether this practice will continue post-lockdown as well as who will be likely to benefit from the costs savings and productivity gains arising from HBW.

    One year on from the start of the first Covid lockdown which saw many jobs become home-based, workplaces are beginning to reflect and look forward to how remote working can continue to be incorporated into a hybrid work schedule. With fewer people expected to be spending five days a week in offices, who would benefit from these long-term changes? Will employers monopolise the absorption of them, or will they be passed to workers?

    The Times article titled “Home working makes Scots healthier” highlights some of the financial, health and practicality benefits that working from home can have for both the employer and employee, giving examples such as Scots workers being less likely to take a day off sick whilst working from home, and therefore being more productive. The article finds that although there is still a need for offices for social interaction and mental wellbeing, going forward it is likely that they will be used by fewer people on a full-time basis.

    The opinions of David Cabrelli and Lila Skountridaki help to create a balanced evaluation of the pros and cons to HBW, and question where any financial gains of a remote workforce should be best placed within the organisation. In the article, David Cabrelli warns that “employees may face higher costs in utility bills if they work from home all the time” and counters this with a note that this could be “partially offset by a reduction in other costs such as commuting, work clothing and eating out.”
    PersonsDavid Cabrelli, Lila Skountridaki

Keywords

  • economics
  • home-based working
  • working from home
  • Labour Law
  • Employment Law