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Personal profile

Biography

I undertook my PhD in the Genetics of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Queen's University Belfast in 2003, and then trained in Nephrology in both Belfast and Edinburgh. I was awarded an MRC Clinician Scientist Fellowship in 2007 and moved to the Centre for Inflammation Research (CIR) in the University of Edinburgh to investigate the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephrology. I was awarded a Scottish Senior Clinical Fellowship in 2012 and currently study the role of diabetes and hypertension in promoting kidney disease. I also lead the renal module of the undergraduate medical curriculum and work part-time as an Honorary Consultant Nephrologist in the Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh.

Current Research Interests

Diabetic kidney disease is the single most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the Western world, accounting for 20% of all incident cases of dialysis in the UK and up to 50% in the US. I am investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, combining novel rodent models with unbiased gene expression analysis. Good blood sugar and blood pressure control can result in regression of nephropathy in patients with diabetes and I am particularly interested in dissecting the mechanisms by which this may occur. This work is in collaboration with Prof John Mullins, Dr Matt Bailey and Dr Laura Denby from the Centre for Cardiovascular Science and Dr Jeremy Hughes and Prof Neil Henderson from the CIR. I am also collaborating with the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study Investigators to examine the utility of urinary biomarkers to predict renal outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes.

The recent increase in the incidence of diabetic nephropathy is largely driven by the epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore I am collaborating with Dr Nik Morton from the Centre for Cardiovascular Science to investigate the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

My research in a nutshell

Diabetic kidney disease is the single most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the Western world, accounting for 20% of all incident cases of dialysis in the UK and up to 50% in the US. I am investigating the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, combining novel rodent models with unbiased gene expression analysis. Good blood sugar and blood pressure control can result in regression of nephropathy in patients with diabetes and I am particularly interested in dissecting the mechanisms by which this may occur. This work is in collaboration with Prof John Mullins, Dr Matt Bailey and Dr Laura Denby from the Centre for Cardiovascular Science and Dr Jeremy Hughes and Prof Neil Henderson from the CIR. I am also collaborating with the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study Investigators to examine the utility of urinary biomarkers to predict renal outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes.

The recent increase in the incidence of diabetic nephropathy is largely driven by the epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore I am collaborating with Prof Nik Morton from the Centre for Cardiovascular Science to investigate the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

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