A Catholic England: National Continuities and Disruptions in Robert Hugh Benson's The Dawn of All

Maxim Shadurski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

The article examines Robert Hugh Benson's under-studied novel The Dawn of All (1911), which creates a seemingly utopian vision of a Catholic England. In the historical context of the expansion of the apparatus of the state, the novel does not herald the triumph of Catholicism in England; rather, it seeks to put off any reformist endeavours predicated on a leap of faith and involving failures of memory. Ultimately, Benson's novel indicates that any threat to the continuity of national identity is bound to fail, unless the powers of memory are usurped by those of faith.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)712-728
JournalModern Language Review
Volume107
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

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