A chromosome-based model for estimating the number of conserved segments between pairs of species from comparative genetic maps

D Waddington, A J Springbett, D W Burt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Comparative genetic maps of two species allow insights into the rearrangements of their genomes since divergence from a common ancestor. When the map details the positions of genes (or any set of orthologous DNA sequences) on chromosomes, syntenic blocks of one or more genes may be identified and used, with appropriate models, to estimate the number of chromosomal segments with conserved content conserved between species. We propose a model for the distribution of the lengths of unobserved segments on each chromosome that allows for widely differing chromosome lengths. The model uses as data either the counts of genes in a syntenic block or the distance between extreme members of a block, or both. The parameters of the proposed segment length distribution, estimated by maximum likelihood, give predictions of the number of conserved segments per chromosome. The model is applied to data from two comparative maps for the chicken, one with human and one with mouse.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-32
Number of pages10
JournalGenetics
Volume154
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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