A comparison of conventional and minimally invasive multilevel surgery for children with diplegic cerebral palsy

Tomos Aled Edwards, Nicky Thompson, Robin Prescott, Julie Stebbins, James Wright, Tim Theologis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim
To compare changes in gait kinematics and walking speed 24 months after conventional (C-MLS) and minimally invasive (MI-MLS) multilevel surgery for children with diplegic cerebral palsy (CP).
Patients and methods
A retrospective analysis of 19 children following C-MLS, mean age at surgery 12 years 5 months (range 7y 10m, 15y 11m), and 36 children following MI-MLS, mean age at surgery 10 years 7 months (range 7y 1m, 14y 10m), was performed. The Gait Profile Score (GPS) and walking speed were collected pre-operatively and 6, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. Type and frequency of procedures as part of MLS, surgical adverse events and subsequent surgery were recorded.
Results
In both groups, GPS improved from the pre-operative gait analysis to the 6 month assessment with maintenance at 12 and 24 months post-operatively. While reduced at 6 months in both groups, walking speed returned to pre-operative speed by 12 months. The overall pattern of change in GPS and walking speed was similar over time following C-MLS and MI-MLS. There was a mean of 9.3 and 9.5 procedures per child as part of C-MLS and MI-MLS, respectively. Surgical adverse events occurred in 7 (37%) and 13 (36%) children with 4 (21%) and 13 (36%) patients requiring subsequent surgery following C-MLS and MI-MLS, respectively.
Conclusion
This study indicates similar improvements in gait kinematics and walking speed 24 months after C-MLS and MI-MLS for children with diplegic CP.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-197
Number of pages6
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume103-B
Issue number1
Early online date31 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 Dec 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A comparison of conventional and minimally invasive multilevel surgery for children with diplegic cerebral palsy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this