A macroscopic analysis of human dentition at Late Chalcolithic Çamlıbel Tarlası, North Central Anatolia, with special reference to dietary and non-masticatory habits

Benjamin Irvine, Jayne-Leigh Thomas, Ulf-Dietrich Schoop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Çamlıbel Tarlası (3590–3470 cal BC) is a small farming settlement with metallurgical activity in north central Anatolia. Studies have demonstrated a direct relationship between diet, subsistence patterns, occupational habits and macrowear patterns and dental pathologies. In total 282 teeth from 26 individuals were macroscopically examined. The results showed that in many ways the inhabitants were typical of a Late Chalcolithic population with a subsistence based on mixed agriculture. Dental wear and pathologies were documented including abrasion, attrition, chipping, “cupping”, grooves, caries, calculus and enamel hypoplasias. There was also an interesting age-differentiated wear pattern, and purple/red discoloured teeth. These dental pathologies and lesions are hypothesised to have been the result of dietary and food processing habits such as the consumption of carbohydrates and the use of grinding stones. Habitual extra masticatory use during the manufacturing of lithics, metal, and fibre processing is also thought to have resulted in the observed dental lesions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-30
Number of pages12
JournalInterdisciplinaria Archaeologica - Natural Sciences in Archaeology
VolumeV
Issue number1
Early online date25 Aug 2014
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • Chalcolithic Period
  • Turkey
  • Anatolian Archaeology
  • dental pathology
  • human osteology

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