A method to march madness? institutional logics and the 2006 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I men's basketball tournament

R.M. Southall, M.S. Nagel, J.M. Amis, C. Southall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As the United States' largest intercollegiate athletic event, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's basketball tournament consistently generates high television ratings and attracts higher levels of advertising spending than the Super Bowl or the World Series. Given the limited analysis of the organizational conditions that frame these broadcasts' production, this study examines the impact of influential actors on the representation process. Using a mixed-method. approach, this paper investigates production conditions and processes involved in producing a sample (n. = 31) of NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament broadcasts, examines the extent to which these broadcasts are consistent with the NCAA's educational mission, and considers the dominant institutional logic that underpins their reproduction. In so doing, this analysis provides a critical examination of the 2006 NCAA. Division I men's basketball tournament broadcasts, and how such broadcasts constitute, and are constituted by, choices in television production structures and practices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-700
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Sport Management
Volume22
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2008

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