A model of non-elemental associative learning in the mushroom body neuropil of the insect brain

Jan Wessnitzer*, Barbara Webb, Darren Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We developed a computational model of the mushroom body (MB), a prominent region of multimodal integration in the insect brain, and tested the model's performance for non-elemental associative learning in visual pattern avoidance tasks. We employ a realistic spiking neuron model and spike time dependent plasticity, and learning performance is investigated in closed-loop conditions. We show that the distinctive neuroarchitecture (divergence onto MB neurons and convergence from MB neurons, with an otherwise non-specific connectivity) is sufficient for solving non-elemental learning tasks and thus modulating underlying reflexes in context- dependent, heterarchical manner.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdaptive and Natural Computing Algorithms
Subtitle of host publication8th International Conference on Adaptive and Natural Computing Algorithms (ICANNGA), Proceedings, Part 1
EditorsB Beliczynski, A Dzielinski, M Iwanowski, B Ribeiro
Place of PublicationBERLIN
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
Pages488-497
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)978-3-540-71589-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event8th International Conference on Adaptive and Natural Computing Algorithms (ICANNGA) - Warsaw, Poland
Duration: 11 Apr 200714 Apr 2007

Publication series

NameLECTURE NOTES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE
PublisherSPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN
Volume4431
ISSN (Print)0302-9743

Conference

Conference8th International Conference on Adaptive and Natural Computing Algorithms (ICANNGA)
Country/TerritoryPoland
Period11/04/0714/04/07

Keywords

  • OLFACTORY SYSTEM
  • BODIES
  • COCKROACH
  • ORGANIZATION
  • PLASTICITY
  • HONEYBEE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A model of non-elemental associative learning in the mushroom body neuropil of the insect brain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this