A multicenter trial of the efficacy of nimodipine on outcome after severe head injury. The European Study Group on Nimodipine in Severe Head Injury

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Abstract

Between January 1, 1989, and June 30, 1991, 852 severely head-injured patients were entered into a prospective placebo-controlled trial of the efficacy of nimodipine administration. The patients could not obey commands at the time of entry into the trial, which was within 12 hours after the start of the inability to obey commands and within 24 hours of injury. The main hypothesis that nimodipine would increase the percentage of patients with a favorable outcome (moderate disability or good recovery) from 50% to 60% was rejected. A trend toward a favorable effect was seen in patients who exhibited traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the computerized tomography (CT) scan obtained prior to entry into the study. The effect was statistically significant in those patients who complied with all protocol requirements. This finding is consistent with the effect of nimodipine on secondary ischemia following spontaneous SAH. The results of the study warrant a clinical trial of the efficacy of nimodipine in severely head-injured patients who show traumatic SAH on the initial CT scan.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)797-804
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Neurosurgery
Volume80
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1994

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Brain Injuries
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Nimodipine
  • Placebos
  • Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
  • Time Factors
  • Treatment Outcome

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