A name rightly given? The use, abuse, and adoption of the term ‘cybernat’ during the Scottish referendum debate

Rowan R. Mackay

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

On September 18, 2014, voters in Scotland were asked in a referendum, “Should Scotland be an independent country?”, ending a hard and often bitterly fought campaign between those who would vote “Yes” and those who would vote “No”. During the campaign, the term “cybernat” was used, in the main pejoratively, to describe individuals on the Nationalist side of the debate who were vociferous—that much can be agreed upon; whether the term cybernat was only used to describe bullying Internet “trolls”, or whether it was used to denigrate outspoken and passionate political debate, has not got the same consensus. In this chapter, with data from Twitter, I discuss the term and its (de)legitimizing force.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDiscourses of (De)Legitimization
Subtitle of host publicationParticipatory Culture in Digital Contexts
EditorsAndrew S. Ross, Damian J. Rivers
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter3
Pages55-82
Number of pages28
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781351263887
ISBN (Print)9781138578753, 9780367584146
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Nov 2018

Publication series

NameRoutledge Critical Studies in Discourse

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