A new tyrannosaurine specimen (Theropoda: Tyrannosauroidea) with insect borings from the Upper Cretaceous Honglishan Formation of Northwestern China

Feng Li, Shundong Bi, Michael Pittman, Stephen L. Brusatte, Xing Xu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

A large theropod ilium was recently collected from the Upper Cretaceous Honglishan Formation in the Sangequan area of the northern Junggar Basin, Xinjiang, China, which represents the first officially reported dinosaur fossil from this formation. Several morphological features, including robust supraacetabular ridge, reduced supracetabular crest, concave anterior margin of the pubic peduncle, ventral flange on the pubic peduncle, converging dorsal surface of the iliac blades, laterally visible cuppedicus shelf, and ventral flange on the posterior surface of pubic peduncle, suggest that this specimen can be referred to Tyrannosaurinae, and furthermore, a few differences between this specimen and other tyrannosaurines in particular the contemporary Asian tyrannosaurine Tarbosaurus suggest that IVPP V22757 may represent a new tyrannosaurine species. However, in the absence of extensive data that would make it possible to properly evaluate these differences, we refrain from naming a new taxon based on this specimen. Some insect borings are also identified in this specimen, and are referable to the ichnogenus Cubiculum, which is interpreted as the insect pupichnia. This new fossil documents the presence of a gigantic theropod in the Upper Cretaceous of Junggar Basin, adding new information on its poorly studied ecosystems.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCretaceous Research
Early online date11 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Jun 2016

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Theropod
  • Tyrannosaurine
  • Upper Cretaceous
  • Honglishan Formation
  • Junggar Basin
  • Insect borings

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