A prospective cross-sectional survey of UK-based dog owners to explore canine handling intolerances and owner willingness to disclose these to veterinary professionals

Emma Campbell, M Connor, Louise Buckley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background:
Canine handling intolerances (CHI) can be problematic for veterinary professionals (VPs), particularly when not disclosed by owners.

Aims:
This study explored apparent prevalence of CHI during veterinary practice visits, owner willingness to disclose intolerances to VPs and their beliefs as to responsibilities for disclosure and risks of non-disclosure.

Methods:
Using a prospective cross-sectional study design, an online, social media-based survey was distributed, which
generated 471 usable responses over 4 months.

Findings:
The majority (60.7%) of dogs had CHI. Most owners (78.1%) would definitely alert VPs to CHI, 90.5% believed it was primarily the owners’ responsibility to disclose, with non-disclosure perceived to make procedures high risk for VPs. Veterinary practices could help prevent CHI, with puppy classes and information on canine body language wanted.

Conclusion:
With CHI common, owners and VPs have roles to play in prevention, disclosure and management to minimiserisk to VPs and ensure all parties’ welfare.
Original languageEnglish
JournalVeterinary Nurse
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2020

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