A prospective cross-sectional survey of UK-based dog owners to explore canine handling intolerances and owner willingness to disclose these to veterinary professionals

Emma Campbell, M Connor, Louise Buckley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Background:
Canine handling intolerances (CHI) can be problematic for veterinary professionals (VPs), particularly when not disclosed by owners.

Aims:
This study explored apparent prevalence of CHI during veterinary practice visits, owner willingness to disclose intolerances to VPs and their beliefs as to responsibilities for disclosure and risks of non-disclosure.

Methods:
Using a prospective cross-sectional study design, an online, social media-based survey was distributed, which
generated 471 usable responses over 4 months.

Findings:
The majority (60.7%) of dogs had CHI. Most owners (78.1%) would definitely alert VPs to CHI, 90.5% believed it was primarily the owners’ responsibility to disclose, with non-disclosure perceived to make procedures high risk for VPs. Veterinary practices could help prevent CHI, with puppy classes and information on canine body language wanted.

Conclusion:
With CHI common, owners and VPs have roles to play in prevention, disclosure and management to minimiserisk to VPs and ensure all parties’ welfare.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Veterinary Nurse
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2020

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