A study on the potential role of occlusal fissure fractures in the aetiopathogenesis of equine cheek teeth apical infections

Katherina Yokota Wellmann, Paddy Dixon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Thirty nine equine cheek teeth diagnosed as having anachoretic apical infections and also having occlusal fissure fractures, but without occlusal pulpar exposure, that had been orally extracted without causing occlusal damage and 10 control teeth were used in this study. The teeth were individually imaged by computed tomography, occlusally stained with methylene blue and visually re-examined, then sectioned subocclusally at 5 mm intervals until the fissure fractures could no longer be detected. A limited histological study was then performed on 7 apically infected and 5 control teeth. Standard computed tomography only detected 1/39 fissure fractures. Thirteen of the 39 stained teeth had subocclusal fissure fractures identified at circa 6mm beneath the surface and in nine of these 13 teeth the fissure fractures had deeper staining to a level immediately above or in a pulp horn, indicating a potential route for bacterial pulpitis. However, the extraction process, the long-term formalin storage or the processing of teeth for this study, may have caused or deepened some of the observed fissure fractures. Additionally, methylene blue may penetrate dental tissue more readily than bacteria can invade. Further studies on the potential role of fissure fractures in the aetiopathogenesis of cheek teeth apical infection are warranted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-178
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Veterinary Dentistry
Early online date13 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Jan 2020

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