A system lifeworld perspective on dying in long term care settings for older people: Contested states in contested places

Katherine Froggatt*, Jo Hockley, Deborah Parker, Kevin Brazil

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Abstract

In many Western countries, older people live and die in long-term institutional care settings. Habermas's concepts of lifeworld, system and communicative action are drawn upon to illuminate the experience of living and dying in this particular place. It is proposed that dying older adults, their family and care staff occupy different contested states and long term care settings are contested places, located in a wider system. This wider system, mediated through care homes, can colonise the life world experiences of dying individuals. The development of communicative space bridges the lifeworld and system and offers a way for the lifeworld of dying individuals, and those around them to be reintegrated into, and influence the wider system. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-268
Number of pages6
JournalHealth & Place
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2010

Keywords

  • Care home
  • Long term care setting
  • Death and dying
  • Lifeworld
  • System
  • NURSING-HOMES
  • DEATH
  • LIFE
  • DEMENTIA
  • ENGLAND
  • END

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