A tale of two liberalisms? Attitudes toward minority religious symbols in Quebec and Canada

Luc Turgeon, Antoine Bilodeau, Stephen E. White, Ailsa Henderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Proponents of restrictions on the wearing of religious symbols in public institutions in Quebec have often framed their support in the language of liberalism, with references to “gender equality”, “state neutrality” and “freedom of conscience”. However, efforts to account for support for restrictions on minority religious symbols rarely mention liberalism. In this article, we test the hypothesis that holding liberal values might have different attitudinal consequences in Quebec and the rest of Canada. Our findings demonstrate that holding liberal values is associated with support for restrictions on the wearing of minority religious symbols in Quebec, but opposition to such restrictions in the rest of Canada. Moreover, this difference in the relationship between liberal values and support for restrictions on minority religious symbols in Quebec and the rest of Canada can explain Quebecers’ greater support for restrictions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-265
JournalCanadian Journal of Political Science
Volume52
Issue number2
Early online date24 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2019

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