A WIDER CONTEXT FOR GENE TRAP MUTAGENESIS

Joshua M. Brickman, Anestis Tsakiridis, Christine To, William L. Stanford

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingOther chapter contribution

Abstract

Gene trapping is a technology originally developed for the simultaneous identification and mutation of genes by random integration in embryonic stem (ES) cells. While gene trapping was developed before efficient and high-throughput gene targeting, a significant proportion of the publically available mutant ES cell lines and mice were generated through a number of large-scale gene trapping initiatives. Moreover, elements of gene trap vectors continue to be incorporated into gene targeting vectors as a means to increase the efficiency of homologous recombination. Here, we review the current state of gene trapping technology and the applications of specific types of gene trap vector. As a component of this analysis, we consider the behavior of specific vector types both from the perspective of their application and how they can inform our annotation of the mammalian transcriptome. We consider the utility of gene trap vectors as tools for cell-based expression analysis, targeted screening in embryonic differentiation, and for use in cell lines derived from different lineages.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMETHODS IN ENZYMOLOGY, VOL 477: GUIDE TO TECHNIQUES IN MOUSE DEVELOPMENT, PART B: MOUSE MOLECULAR GENETICS, SECOND EDITION
Place of PublicationSAN DIEGO
PublisherELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC
Pages271-295
Number of pages25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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