Accuracy of Herdsmen Reporting versus Serologic Testing for Estimating Foot-and-Mouth Disease Prevalence

Kenton L. Morgan, Ian G. Handel, Vincent N. Tanya, Saidou M. Hamman, Charles Nfon, Ingrid E. Bergman, Viviana Malirat, Karl J. Sorensen, Mark Bronsvoort

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Herdsman-reported disease prevalence is widely used in veterinary epidemiologic studies, especially for diseases with visible external lesions; however, the accuracy of such reports is rarely validated. Thus, we used latent class analysis in a Bayesian framework to compare sensitivity and specificity of herdsman reporting with virus neutralization testing and use of 3 nonstructural protein ELISAs for estimates of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) prevalence on the Adamawa plateau of Cameroon in 2000. Herdsman-reported estimates in this FMD-endemic area were comparable to those obtained from serologic testing. To harness to this cost-effective resource of monitoring emerging infectious diseases, we suggest that estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of herdsmen reporting should be done in parallel with serologic surveys of other animal diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2048-2054
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2014

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