Adaptive trials for tuberculosis: early reflections on theory and practice

C. M. Montgomery*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

SETTING: Adaptive designs (ADs) have been proposed for anti-tuberculosis treatment trials. This call for innovation occurs against the backdrop of fundamental changes in the acceptable evidence base in anti-tuberculosis treatment.

OBJECTIVE: To contextualise ADs for tuberculosis (TB) and explore early responses from those working in the field.

DESIGN: In this qualitative study investigating processes of theoretical and practical change in randomised controlled trials, 24 interviews were conducted with professionals involved in AD trials, half of whom worked in the TB field.

RESULTS: Clinical trialists working on AD trials in TB are positive about the efficiency these designs offer, but remain cautious about their suitability. In addition to technical concerns, informants discussed the challenges of implementing AD in developing countries, including limited regulatory capacity to evaluate proposals, investments needed in infrastructure and site capacity, and challenges regarding informed consent. Respondents identified funding, interdisciplinary communication and regulatory and policy responses as additional concerns potentially affecting the success of AD for TB.

CONCLUSION: Empirical research is needed into patient experiences of AD, including informed consent. Further consideration of the contexts of innovation in trial design is needed. These are fundamental to the successful translation of theory into practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1091-1098
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • adaptive design
  • clinical trials
  • tuberculosis
  • statistics
  • context
  • MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
  • CLINICAL-TRIALS
  • STANDARDIZED TREATMENT
  • DESIGNS
  • DRUGS
  • CHALLENGES
  • REGIMEN

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