Adult dyslexic readers do not demonstrate regularity effects in sentence processing: eEvidence from eye-movements.

Manon Wyn Jones, M. Louise Kelly, Martin Corley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We report an eye-movement study that demonstrates differences in regularity effects between adult developmental dyslexic and control non-impaired readers, in contrast to findings from a large number of word recognition studies (see G. Brown, 1997). For low frequency words, controls showed an advantage for Regular items, in which grapheme-to-phoneme strategies could be employed, compared with Irregular Consistent and Inconsistent items, in which rime comparisons or whole word recognition strategies would be advantageous. We propose that in sentential contexts, dyslexic readers do not generate sufficient phonological cues in the parafovea in order to demonstrate the regularity effects typical of unimpaired readers (e.g., S. Sereno & K. Rayner, 2000). These findings suggest that phonological strategies are sensitive to task demands, and underline the impact of methodology on the conclusions that are drawn about dyslexic reading ability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)933-943
Number of pages11
JournalReading and writing
Volume20
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2007

Keywords

  • eye-tracking
  • dyslexia
  • regularity
  • PHONOLOGICAL CODES
  • SOUND REGULARITY
  • WORD RECOGNITION
  • INFORMATION
  • FIXATIONS

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