Alternative models of youth justice: Lessons from Scotland and Northern Ireland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Purpose – Widespread criticism of the youth justice system in England and Wales has resulted in calls for it to adopt a restorative paradigm. This paper seeks to review the historical development of youth justice in neighbouring Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach – The historical development of youth justice in Scotland and Northern Ireland is reviewed with a view to learning lessons from these two very different models, compared to the current model in England and Wales.

Findings – It is argued that those tasked with reforming the system in England and Wales must understand the underlying political, cultural and social contexts in which alternative models have developed and satisfactorily resolve the conflicting needs and rights of the offender versus those of the victim, community and wider public.

Originality/value – Transfer of policy and practice from other jurisdictions requires careful consideration of their political, cultural and social contexts but England and Wales may benefit greatly from adopting restorative practices similar to those in Northern Ireland. However, successful implementation will depend on political will and institutional infrastructure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106-114
JournalJournal of Children's Services
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords / Materials (for Non-textual outputs)

  • Scotland
  • Northern Ireland
  • justice
  • comparative
  • youth
  • child welfare

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