Anatomy is Symmetry's Best Friend: Reflections on Modeling Baylis and Driver

John Hicks, Jon Oberlander

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

An aptitude for the detection of bilateral symmetry is a fairly prominent aspect of the human visual system. Knowledge of the reasons behind this facility is not so well established, however. Some of the behavioral data indicates that processing of symmetric and non-symmetric stimuli is undertaken in two wholly dierent manners (i.e. serial versus parallel). However, the interpretation of this as being due to high level cognitive preferences does not exhaust the list of possible explanations. Using a split-neural network model, we show that instead of cognitive preferences, gross morphological factors may play a large role in underwriting the ability to detect symmetry as a special case of shape perception. The
earlier model is consistent with behavioral data, but Occam's razor suggests that we might prefer the newer morphological explanation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
EditorsWayne D. Gray, Christian Schunn
PublisherLawrence Erlbaum Associates
Pages465-470
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)0-8058-4583-6
ISBN (Print)0-8058-4581-X
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Event24th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society - George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, United States
Duration: 7 Aug 200210 Aug 2002

Conference

Conference24th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityFairfax, VA
Period7/08/0210/08/02

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