Animal African Trypanosomiasis: time to increase focus on clinically relevant parasite and host species

Liam Morrison, Laura Vezza, Tim Rowan, Jayne Hope

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Abstract

Animal African trypanosomiasis (AAT), caused by Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax, remains one of the most important livestock diseases in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly affecting cattle. Despite this, our detailed knowledge largely stems from the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei and mouse experimental models. In the postgenomic era, the genotypic and phenotypic differences between the AAT-relevant species of parasite or host and their model organism counterparts are increasingly apparent. Here, we outline the timeliness and advantages of increasing the research focus on both the clinically relevant parasite and host species, given that improved tools and resources for both have been developed in recent years. We propose that this shift of emphasis will improve our ability to efficiently develop tools to combat AAT.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)599-607
JournalTrends in Parasitology
Volume32
Issue number8
Early online date8 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2016

Keywords

  • African Animal Trypanosomiasis
  • trypanosome
  • Trypanosoma congolense
  • Trypanosoma vivax
  • livestock
  • bovine
  • immunology

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