Anti-poverty activities in a liberal welfare model: Local levers and multi-level tensions in Glasgow, UK

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Using a case study of Glasgow, UK, this chapter discusses the design and delivery of anti-poverty activities in a post-industrial left-wing city located within a national liberal welfare model. Focusing on the multi-level architecture of the British welfare state, the chapter draws attention to the local arrangement and institutional relations between organisations engaged in employment, social service and broadly speaking, anti-poverty work in the city. As well as outlining the role of public and non-public sector organisations, Bennett explores issues of partnership working, competing initiatives and the politics of poverty. This chapter outlines the levers local actors utilise to deliver anti-poverty services and reflects on multi-level tensions, competing agendas and conflicting ways of working.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCombating Poverty in Local Welfare Systems
EditorsHakan Johansson, Alexandru Panican
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter6
Pages129-154
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781137531902
ISBN (Print)9781137531896
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2016

Publication series

NameWork and Welfare in Europe
PublisherPalgrave MacMillan

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