Apoptosis does not contribute to the blood lymphocytopenia observed after intensive and downhill treadmill running in humans

Richard J Simpson, Geraint D Florida-James, Greg P Whyte, James R Black, James A Ross, Keith Guy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The lymphocytopenia that occurs during the recovery stage of exercise may be a result of apoptosis through an increased expression of CD95, a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD55 and CD59, or both. Trained subjects completed intensive, moderate, and downhill treadmill-running protocols. Blood lymphocytes isolated before, immediately after, 1h after, and 24h after each exercise test were assessed for markers of apoptosis (Annexin-V(+), HSP60(+)), and CD55, CD59, and CD95 expression by flow cytometry. Lymphocytopenia occurred 1h after intensive and downhill running exercise, but no changes in the percentage of Annexin-V + or HSP60 + lymphocytes were found. Numbers of CD95(+), CD55(dim), and CD59(dim) lymphocytes increased immediately after intensive and downhill exercise, which were attributed to the selective mobilization and subsequent efflux of CD8(+) and CD56(+) lymphocyte subsets. No differences were found between the intensive and downhill protocols. In conclusion, apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes does not appear to contribute to exercise-induced lymphocytopenia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-74
Number of pages18
JournalResearch in Sports Medicine
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Nov 2007

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Antigens, CD
  • Antigens, CD55
  • Antigens, CD59
  • Antigens, CD95
  • Apoptosis
  • Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins
  • Cell Count
  • Chaperonin 60
  • Exercise
  • Exercise Test
  • Flow Cytometry
  • Humans
  • Lymphocytosis
  • Lymphopenia
  • Male
  • Muscle, Skeletal
  • Necrosis
  • Running

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