Approaching the Atrium Through the Intraparietal Sulcus: Mapping the Sulcal Morphology and Correlating the Surgical Corridor to Underlying Fiber Tracts

Christos Koutsarnakis, Faidon Liakos, Aristotelis V Kalyvas, Evangelia Liouta, John Emelifeonwu, Theodosis Kalamatianos, Damianos E Sakas, Elizabeth Johnson, George Stranjalis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKROUND: Although the operative corridor used during the intraparietal transsulcal approach to the atrium has been previously investigated, most anatomical studies focus on its relationship to the optic radiations.

OBJECTIVE: To study the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) morphology and to explore the subcortical anatomy with regard to the surgical trajectory used during the intraparietal transsulcal tranventricular approach.

METHODS: Twenty-five adult, formalin fixed, cerebral hemispheres were investigated. Fifteen underwent the Klingler procedure and were dissected in a lateromedial direction using the fiber microdissection technique. The trajectory of the dissection resembled that of real operative settings. The remaining 10 hemispheres were cut along the longitudinal axis of the sulcus in order to correlate its surface anatomy to corresponding parts of the ventricular system.

RESULTS: IPS demonstrated an interrupted course in 36% of the specimens while its branching pattern was variable. The sulcus anterior half was found to overly the atrium in all occasions. Four discrete, consecutive white matter layers were identified en route to the atrium, ie, the arcuate fibers, the arcuate segment of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, the corona radiata and tapetum, with the arcuate segment being near to the dissection trajectory.

CONCLUSION: Given the angle of brain transgression during the intraparietal approach, we found the optimal dissection area to be the very middle of the sulcus. The IPS-postcentral sulcus meeting point, in contrast to previous thought, proved to risk potential injury to the arcuate segment of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, thus affecting surgical outcome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-516
Number of pages14
JournalOperative Neurosurgery
Volume13
Issue number4
Early online date27 Feb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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