Are we heading in the same direction? European and African doctors' and nurses' views and experiences regarding outcome measurement in palliative care

B A Daveson, S T Simon, H Benalia, J Downing, I J Higginson, R Harding, C Bausewein, PRISMA, Natalia Monteiro Calanzani (Member of Consortium)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine and compare doctors' and nurses' views and experiences regarding outcome measurement in palliative care, including patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs).

METHODS: A web-based survey developed through expert review and piloting was conducted in Europe and Africa with palliative care professionals working in clinical care, audit and research.

RESULTS: The overall participation rate was 42% (663/1592) and the overall completion rate was 59% (392/663). Of these respondents, 196 were doctors (51% male, mean 47 years) and 104 were nurses (84% female, mean 45 years). Doctors' most common reported reasons for not using tools were time constraints followed by lack of training. For nurses, it was lack of training followed by time constraints. Provision of information and guidance influenced willingness to use measures. For those that used tools, most reported favourable outcome measurement experiences. Both prioritized brief PROMs, and measures that included physical and psychological domains. For clinical purposes, the main advantage for doctors was assessment/screening, and clinical decision making for nurses. For research, doctors were most influenced by a measure's comparability with national/international literature followed by its validation in palliative care. For nurses, validation in palliative care was followed by tool access.

CONCLUSION: Overall these respondents shared similar views and experiences, and both were influenced by similar factors. Multidisciplinary outcome measurement education and training is feasible and required. Multidimensional and brief PROMs that include physical and psychological domains need to be prioritized, and access to freely available, validated and translated tools is needed to ensure cross-national comparisons and coordination of international research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)242-9
Number of pages8
JournalPalliative Medicine
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Africa
  • Aged
  • Data Collection
  • Decision Making
  • Europe
  • Evidence-Based Practice
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Internet
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Nurses
  • Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
  • Palliative Care
  • Physicians

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