Assessing Cognitive Therapy Instead Of Neuroleptics: Rationale, study design and sample characteristics of the ACTION trial

A. P. Morrison, Melissa Wardle, Paul Hutton, Linda Davies, Graham Dunn, Alison Brabban, Rory Byrne, Laura Drage, Helen Spencer, Douglas Turkington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: Recent evidence regarding over-estimation of the efficacy of antipsychotics and under-estimation of their toxicity, as well as emerging data regarding alternative treatment options, suggest it may be time to introduce patient choice. However, only a small number of studies have reported on the efficacy of interventions for psychological interventions such as cognitive therapy. Early results suggest that cognitive therapy may be an effective, well-tolerated treatment for people who choose not to take antipsychotics. We report on the rationale and design for a multi-site randomised, controlled trial of cognitive therapy for people with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis who choose not to take antipsychotics.

Methods: The study employs a single-blind design in which all participants receive treatment as usual, and half are randomised to up to 30 sessions of cognitive therapy for up to 9 months. Participants will be followed-up for a minimum of 9 months and to a maximum of 18 months.

Results: We report the characteristics of the final sample at baseline (N = 74).

Conclusions: Our study aims to expand the currently limited evidence base for best practice in interventions for individuals with psychosis who choose not to take antipsychotics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-92
JournalPsychosis
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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