Atopy is inversely related to schistosome infection intensity: a comparative study in Zimbabwean villages with distinct levels of Schistosoma haematobium infection

Nadine Rujeni, Norman Nausch, Claire D Bourke, Nicholas Midzi, Takafira Mduluza, David W Taylor, Francisca Mutapi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The hygiene hypothesis suggests that parasitic infections protect against allergic diseases by modulating the host's immune responses. Experimental studies indicate that this protection depends on the intensity of parasitic infection, but this observation has not been tested in human populations. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the intensity of Schistosoma haematobium infection is related to atopic responses and whether this relationship differs between populations with distinct parasite transmission dynamics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)288-98
Number of pages11
JournalInternational archives of allergy and immunology
Volume158
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Young Adult
  • Schistosomiasis haematobia
  • Animals
  • Antigens, Dermatophagoides
  • Skin Tests
  • Humans
  • Schistosoma haematobium
  • Aged
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Infant
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Immunoglobulin E
  • Allergens
  • Adult
  • Immunoglobulin G
  • Hypersensitivity, Immediate
  • Middle Aged
  • Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus
  • Adolescent
  • Male
  • Female
  • Zimbabwe

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