Attitudes toward ethnocultural diversity in multilevel political communities: Comparing the effect of national and subnational attachments in Canada

Antoine Bilodeau, Audrey Gagnon, Stephen E. White, Luc Turgeon, Ailsa Henderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It is well documented that the strength of national attachment relates to attitudes toward ethnocultural diversity, and that the direction of the relationship varies across national contexts. Yet, little attention has been given to the fact that attachments may not be expressed solely at the national level. In federal and multinational states, individuals can express attachment to the country and to its territorial units. This study investigates the relationship between (national and provincial) attachments and attitudes toward ethnocultural diversity in the Canadian federation. Our findings indicate that stronger attachments to Canada lead to more positive attitudes toward ethnocultural diversity in all provinces. They also demonstrate that provincial attachments relate to attitudes toward ethnocultural diversity both in a minority nation provincial context (Quebec) and in other provinces (Alberta and Saskatchewan), but that the direction of this relationship can be of opposite direction than that for attachment to Canada.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPublius: The Journal of Federalism
Early online date15 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 15 Jul 2020

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