Back to the woodshop: Black education, imperial pedagogy, and post-racial mythology under the reign of obama

Tommy J. Curry*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

For centuries, European thinkers, and their contemporary white followers, have run rampant in the halls of academia prematurely championing the success of liberalism to speak to the experience of those historical groups of people excluded from modernity, while simultaneously celebrating the universal embrace by the supple bosom of whites' anthropologically specific ideas of reason and humanity. This philosophical impetus has solidified the political regime of integration as not only the most desirable but also the most realizable condition of Black (co)existence in America. The education of Black Americans has been collapsed into a single ideological goal, namely, how to mold these Blacks into more functional and productive members of American society under the idea of equality established by Brown v. Board of Education. Unfortunately, however, such a commitment elevates the ethical appeals made by Brown, which focused on higher ideals of reason and humanity found in liberal political thought and the eventual transcendence of racial identity, to moral code. This ideology, instead of attending to what Blacks should learn or the knowledge Blacks need to have in order to thrive as Blacks in America, forces Blacks to abide by the social motives that aim to create good Negro citizens.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-52
Number of pages26
JournalTeachers College Record
Volume117
Issue number14
Early online date1 Jan 2015
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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