Bacterial lipopolysaccharide confers resistance to G418, doxorubicin, and taxol in the murine macrophage cell line, RAW264

M J Sweet, D A Hume

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Many bacterial pathogens including Salmonella and Listeria replicate within macrophages. The susceptibility of these organisms to various antibiotics is dependent on the ability of macrophages to take up, retain, and deliver the antibiotic to the correct intracellular compartment. In this context, macrophages are known to express proteins that are involved in efflux of antibiotics and cytotoxic drugs, thereby reducing intracellular accumulation of such compounds. In our studies on the action of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the macrophage-like cell line, RAW264 we found that LPS treatment of these cells conferred resistance to the neomycin-related aminoglycoside G418 (geneticin). This phenotype was stable and was specific to LPS since colony-stimulating factor 1 and phorbol myristate acetate had no effect on G418 resistance. We have extended this observation to show that LPS induces transient resistance to the cytotoxic drugs taxol and doxorubicin. Macrophage resistance to cytotoxic drugs and antibiotics may have a number of important clinical consequences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-6
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Leukocyte Biology
Volume59
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1996

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Antibiotics, Antineoplastic
  • Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic
  • Cell Line
  • Cell Survival
  • Doxorubicin
  • Drug Interactions
  • Drug Resistance, Microbial
  • Drug Resistance, Neoplasm
  • Gentamicins
  • Lipopolysaccharides
  • Macrophages
  • Mice
  • Paclitaxel
  • Succinate Dehydrogenase

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