Bare ruin'd choirs: St Peter's Kilmahew: A case study in working with ruins

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Shakespeare’s Sonnet LXXIII begins with a double metaphor. The ageing poet compares himself to the autumn of the year; and then he compares the autumnal trees themselves to the bare ruin’d choirs of abbey churches whose dereliction was when he was writing, only a few decades after the Dissolution of the Monasteries, still new.

This is an essay about a bare ruin’d choir which, as a subtle alteration in tone of the sonnet in itsin the ninth line suggests, contains all the promise of a glowing fire. This case study will explore how ruins – at the first glance, relics of failed pasts – can be recycled to provoke and provide settings for debates about ther, and our future.

The sonnet ends with an injunction « to love that well, which thou must leave ere long »; and the story that this case study describes is an experiment in caring for the ephemeral and the liminal. This is, therefore, not just an argument about ruins, but about our approach to the built environment as a totality, which is a continuous process of ruination, recycling, and renewal.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRecycler l'Urbain
Subtitle of host publicationPour une Écologie des Milieux Habités
EditorsRoberto D'Arienzo, Chris Younès
Place of PublicationParis
PublisherMetis Presses
Pages439-456
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)9782940406944
Publication statusPublished - 23 Oct 2014

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  • No Longer and Not Yet

    Hollis, E., Jul 2013, Reinventing Architecture and Interiors : a socio-political view on building adaptation. Libri Publishing, p. 177-194 18 p.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

  • Anxious Care and Unsightly Aids, a Conversation

    Hollis, E., 1 Nov 2010, To Have and To Hold : The Future of a Contested Landscape. Van Noord, G. (ed.). Edinburgh: Edinburgh: Luath Press, p. 54-58, 98-109 411 p.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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