Being Chinese or being Scottish: National identification and intergroup attitudes of British born Chinese children

Qian Dai*, Evelyn McGregor, Joanne Williams

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explored the age differences in national identification, and intergroup attitudes among British born Chinese (BBC) living in Scotland. Participants comprised 70 children in three age groups (8, 11 and 14 years). The study included three tasks: task 1 investigated children's national self-categorization; task 2 examined children's national self-identification; task 3 explored children's perception of the positive and negative traits of Chinese and Scottish people across the age groups (using card-sorting tasks). The results indicated that BBC children identified their national identity as Scottish, however, it varied with age and national contexts. Most BBC children identified themselves as both Chinese and Scottish but they attributed significantly more positive traits to Chinese than to Scottish people and showed significantly more liking for Chinese people than Scottish. The study concludes that BBC children experience a dual identity in which different components are integrated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-296
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume12
Issue number3
Early online date15 Jan 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 May 2015

Keywords

  • Ethnic minority children
  • National identification
  • Intergroup attitudes
  • ETHNIC-IDENTITY
  • ACCULTURATION
  • IMMIGRATION
  • ENGLISH
  • WEBSITES
  • PEOPLE
  • PUPILS

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