Belief, imagination, and the nature of fiction

Stacie Friend*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract / Description of output

We classify novels, short stories, many films, some ballets, and so on, as works of fiction, and histories, biographies, newspaper articles, documentaries, and so on, as works of nonfiction. How should we distinguish these categories? The most popular philosophical definitions of fiction today maintain that they are distinguished by the attitudes they invite: whereas nonfiction invites belief, fiction invites imagining. In this chapter I consider these and related theories of fiction, as well as reasons to be skeptical that fiction can be defined by the contrast between imagination and belief.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Routledge Handbook of Fiction and Belief
EditorsAlison James, Akihiro Kubo, Françoise Lavocat
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Chapter1
Pages15-27
Number of pages13
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781003119456
ISBN (Print)9780367635152
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Dec 2023

Publication series

NameRoutledge Literature Handbooks
PublisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Group

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  • Learning from fiction 1

    Currie, G., Ferguson, H., Frascaroli, J., Friend, S., Green, K. & Wimmer, L., 22 Dec 2023, The Routledge Handbook of Fiction and Belief. James, A., Kubo, A. & Lavocat, F. (eds.). 1 ed. New York: Taylor and Francis, p. 126-138 13 p. (Routledge Literature Handbooks).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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