beta-propeller repeats and a PDZ domain in the tricorn protease: predicted self-compartmentalisation and C-terminal polypeptide-binding strategies of substrate selection

C P Ponting, M J Pallen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Prokaryotic proteases demonstrate a variety of substrate-selection strategies that prevent uncontrolled protein degradation. Proteasomes and ClpXP-like proteases form oligomeric structures that exclude large substrates from central solvated chambers containing their active sites. Monomeric prolyl oligopeptidases have been shown to contain beta-propeller structures that similarly reduce access to their catalytic residues. By contrast, Tsp-like enzymes contain PDZ domains that are thought to specifically target C-terminal polypeptides. We have investigated the sequence of Thermoplasma acidophilum tricorn protease using recently-developed database search methods. The tricorn protease is known to associate into a 20 hexamer capsid enclosing an extremely large cavity that is 37 nm in diameter. It is unknown, however, how this enzyme selects its small oligopeptide substrates. Our results demonstrate the presence in tricorn protease of a PDZ domain and two predicted six-bladed beta-propeller domains. We suggest that the PDZ domain is involved in targeting non-polar C-terminal peptides, similar to those generated by the T. acidophilum proteasome, whereas the beta-propeller domains serve to exclude large substrates from the tricorn protease active site in a similar manner to that previously indicated for prolyl oligopeptidase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-51
Number of pages5
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume179
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 1999

Keywords

  • Amino Acid Sequence
  • Binding Sites
  • Endopeptidases
  • Molecular Sequence Data
  • Repetitive Sequences, Amino Acid

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