Between Autonomy and Interdependence: The Challenges of Shared Rule after the Scottish Referendum

Nicola McEwen, Bettina Petersohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Drawing on the distinction between self-rule and shared rule in multilevel states, this article argues that shared rule has been the neglected element of the UK devolution settlement. The ability of the devolved administrations to participate in, and influence, national decision making through shared rule mechanisms is very limited. The article argues that the lack of shared rule is especially problematic in light of the increasing complexity of the Scottish devolution settlement in the wake of the Scotland Act 2012 and the Smith commission report. Smith, in particular, seems set to increase both the power of the Scottish Parliament and its dependence on UK policy decisions in the areas of tax, welfare and the economy. Creating a more robust intergovernmental system which could manage these new interdependencies will be a significant challenge, and yet, without such a system, the new settlement will be difficult to sustain.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-200
JournalPolitical Quarterly
Volume86
Issue number2
Early online date20 Apr 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 May 2015

Keywords

  • shared rule
  • self-rule
  • devolution
  • Smith Commission
  • Scotland
  • Interdependence

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