Can a GP be a generalist and a specialist? Stakeholders views on a respiratory General Practitioner with a special interest service in the UK

Mandy A Moffat, Aziz Sheikh, David Price, Annie Peel, Siân Williams, Jen Cleland, Hilary Pinnock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Primary care practitioners have a potentially important role in the delivery of specialist care for people with long-term respiratory diseases. Within the UK the development of a General Practitioner with Special Interests (GPwSI) service delivered within Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) involves a process of 'transitional change' which impacts on the professional roles of clinicians who may embrace or resist change. In addition, the perspective of patients on the new roles is important. The objective of the current study is to explore the attitudes and views of stakeholders to the provision of a respiratory GPwSI service within the six PCTs in Leicester, UK.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Chronic Disease
  • Clinical Competence
  • Cluster Analysis
  • Delivery of Health Care
  • England
  • Focus Groups
  • Health Care Surveys
  • Humans
  • Interviews as Topic
  • Organizational Innovation
  • Physician's Role
  • Physicians, Family
  • Pilot Projects
  • Primary Health Care
  • Questionnaires
  • Respiration Disorders
  • Specialization

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