Capacity building for wildlife health professionals: the Wildlife Health Bridge

Anna Meredith*, Neil Anderson, PRADEEP MALIK, PARAG NIGAM, ALEXANDRA THOMAS, Nic Masters, AMANDA GUTHRIE, HANNAH DAVIDSON, STUART PATTERSON, RAJAN AMIN, Lee F. Skerratt, Richard Kock, Anthony Sainsbury

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Wildlife Health Bridge was established in 2009 with the aim of improving the expertise and knowledge base of wildlife health professionals in biodiverse low- and middle-income countries. The Wildlife Health Bridge centers around partnerships among educational institutions: the Zoological Society of London, the Royal Veterinary College, the University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, the Wildlife Institute of India, and the University of Melbourne Veterinary School. The Wildlife Health Bridge provides quality education in wildlife health, ecosystem health and wildlife biology, facilitates the interchange of students between collaborating countries for research studies and provides a global graduate network of wildlife health professionals. In addition to established Masters’ level wildlife health training programmes run by the partner organisations, the Wildlife Health Bridge has developed a collaborative field-based course, Interventions in Wild Animal Health, provided annually in India since 2016, which has trained 138 veterinarians to date, enhancing local and international capacity in managing emerging wildlife health issues and building global professional linkages. The Wildlife Health Bridge’s Wild Animal Alumni network facilitates networking and exchange between Wildlife Health Bridge institutions and graduates, with over 701 members from 67 countries, half of which are biodiverse low- and middle-income countries. Collaboration between educational institutions has enabled new ideas and ongoing developments in delivery of materials and learning outcomes. The Wildlife Health Bridge is building global capacity in trained wildlife health professionals, through educational programmes and a synergised network, with an aim of impacting conservation practice to benefit human, domestic animal and wildlife health.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68 - 78
Number of pages10
JournalOne Health & Implementation Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 May 2022

Keywords

  • Capacity
  • conservation
  • interventions
  • partnership
  • professional
  • training
  • veterinarian
  • wildlife health

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