Carbon and Phosphorus Cycling in Arabian Sea Sediments across the Oxygen Minimum Zone

Gabriel M. Filippelli, Gregory Cowie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Several studies have focused on carbon, oxygen, and phosphorus dynamics across the modern oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to constrain how signals of modern systems get “locked in” upon burial. In this study, a sequential phosphorus fractionation technique was applied to surficial and sub-surface sediments from stations at depths spanning the OMZ on the Pakistan margin of the Arabian Sea in order to test the oxygen-carbon-phosphorus connection in modern marine sediments. Some early diagenetic loss of phosphorus compared to organic carbon was observed, but a significant portion of the released phosphorus was retained by uptake on oxyhydroxides and by the formation of an authigenic phosphorus-bearing phase. This process is unaffected by station location relative to the OMZ, and results in an effective organic carbon-to-reactive-phosphorus sediment ratio that is close to the average observed for open-ocean sediments, regardless of bottom water oxygen content.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Oceanography and Marine Research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Nov 2017

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