Cell-mediated immunity in herpes simplex virus-infected mice: induction, characterization and antiviral effects of delayed type hypersensitivity

Anthony Nash, Hugh J Field, R Quartey-Papafio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) was induced ihe reaction was observed 4 to 5 days p.i. and could still be induced up to 18 months later. In contrast, the adoptive transfer of DTH using draining lymph node cells was only possible during the period 6 to 10 days p.i. The cells taken at these times also contained mediators of antiviral immunity, as determined by a marked reduction of virus titres in the ears of infected animals 1 to 3 days after transfer. Draining lymph node cells taken at later times contained mediators of virus immunity, but titres were not reduced until day 5 after the transfer. The cell type involved in both the DTH and antiviral activity was a T lymphocyte, although the particular T cell subsets involved have yet to be determined.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2
Pages (from-to)351-7
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume48
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1980

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Antilymphocyte Serum/pharmacology
  • Female
  • Herpes Simplex/immunology
  • Herpes Simplex/microbiology
  • Hypersensitivity, Delayed
  • Immunization, Passive
  • Lymph Nodes/transplantation
  • Mice
  • Mice, Inbred BALB C
  • Simplexvirus/growth & development
  • Simplexvirus/immunology
  • T-Lymphocytes/immunology
  • Transplantation, Homologous

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