Clinicopathological correlates in frontotemporal dementia

John R Hodges, R Rhys Davies, John H Xuereb, Barney Casey, Melissa Broe, Thomas H Bak, Jillian J Kril, Glenda M Halliday

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The term frontotemporal dementia (FTD) encompasses a range of clinical syndromes that are believed not to map reliably onto the spectrum of recognized pathologies. This study reexamines the relationships between clinical and pathological subtypes of FTD in a large series from two centers (n = 61). Clinical subtypes defined were behavioral variant FTD (n = 26), language variants (semantic dementia, n = 9; and progressive nonfluent aphasia, n = 8), and motor variants (corticobasal degeneration, n = 9; and motor neuron disease, n = 9), although most cases presented with a combination of behavioral and language problems. Unexpectedly, some behavioral cases (n = 5) had marked amnesia at presentation. The pathological subtypes were those with tau-immunopositive inclusions (with Pick bodies, n = 20; or without, n = 11), those with ubiquitin immunopositive inclusions (n = 16), and those lacking distinctive histology (n = 14). Behavioral symptoms and semantic dementia were associated with a range of pathologies. In contrast, other clinical phenotypes had relatively uniform underlying pathologies: motor neuron disease predicted ubiquitinated inclusions, parkinsonism and apraxia predicted corticobasal pathology, and nonfluent aphasia predicted Pick bodies. Therefore, the pathological substrate can be predicted in a significant proportion of FTD patients, which has important implications for studies targeting mechanistic treatments.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)399-406
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Indian Academy of Neurology
Volume56
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Brain
  • Dementia
  • Diagnosis, Differential
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Reproducibility of Results
  • Retrospective Studies
  • tau Proteins

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