Cognition at the crime scene: Identifying cognitive demands on professional judgment and decision making expertise of crime scene examiners

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This research highlights the importance of professional judgement and decision making expertise within a skilled Scene Examination workforce. The use of Applied Cognitive Task Analysis allowed for illumination and provision of feedback on the thought processes of experienced Scene Examiners, including detailed observable information about actions taken, situation assessment, and use of critical cues. This information carries a range of operational uses, and can be a valuable addition to existing training. Implicit findings indicated the potential to move training towards a more adaptive expertise base, with consequent gains for the quality of service, and a more flexible and adaptable workforce.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNDM13 Naturalistic Decision Making and Uncertainty
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 13th Bi-annual International Conference on Naturalistic Decision Making
EditorsJulie Gore, Paul Ward
PublisherThe University of Bath
Pages226-230
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9780861971947
Publication statusPublished - 10 Apr 2017
Event13th International Naturalistic Decision Making Conference - University of Bath, Bath
Duration: 20 Jun 201723 Jun 2017

Conference

Conference13th International Naturalistic Decision Making Conference
CityBath
Period20/06/1723/06/17

Keywords

  • decision making
  • crime scene examination
  • accessing expert cognition
  • cognitive demands

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