Cognition in insects

Barbara Webb*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature reviewpeer-review

Abstract

A traditional view of cognition is that it involves an internal process that represents, tracks or predicts an external process. This is not a general characteristic of all complex neural processing or feedback control, but rather implies specific forms of processing giving rise to specific behavioural capabilities. In this paper, I will review the evidence for such capabilities in insect navigation and learning. Do insects know where they are, or do they only know what to do? Do they learn what stimuli mean, or do they only learn how to behave?

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2715-2722
Number of pages8
JournalPhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume367
Issue number1603
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 2012

Keywords

  • insect
  • robot
  • perception
  • learning
  • navigation
  • PATH-INTEGRATION
  • DESERT ANTS
  • LARVAL DROSOPHILA
  • UNCONDITIONED STIMULUS
  • CATAGLYPHIS-FORTIS
  • MELOPHORUS-BAGOTI
  • LEARNED BEHAVIOR
  • FIDDLER-CRABS
  • MODEL
  • NAVIGATION

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