Comparison of affective responses during and after low volume high-intensity interval exercise, continuous moderate- and continuous high-intensity exercise in active, untrained, healthy males

Ailsa Niven, Jacqueline Thow, Jack Holroyd, Anthony Turner, Shaun Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study compared affective responses to low volume high-intensity interval exercise(HIIE), moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE) and high-intensity continuous exercise (HICE). Twelve untrained males (VO2 max 48.2 ± 6.7 ml·kg-1·min-1)completed MICE (30 min cycle at 85% of ventilatory threshold (VT)), HICE (cycle at105% of VT matched with MICE for total work), and HIIE (10 x 6 s cycle sprints with 60s recovery). Affective valence and perceived activation were measured before exercise, post warm-up, every 20% of exercise time, and 1, 5, 10, and 15 min post exercise. Affective valence during exercise declined by 1.75 ± 2.42, 1.17 ± 1.99, and0.42 ± 1.38 units in HICE, HIIE, and MICE, respectively, but was not statistically influenced by trial (P = 0.35), time (P = 0.06), or interaction effect (P = 0.08). Affective valence during HICE and HIIE was consistently less positive than MICE. Affective valence post-exercise was not statistically influenced by trial (P = 0.10) and at 5 min post-exercise exceeded end-exercise values (P = 0.048). Circumplex profiles showed no negative affect in any trial. Affective responses to low volume HIIE are similar to HICE but remain positive and rebound rapidly, suggesting it may be a potential alternative exercise prescription.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1993-2001
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume36
Issue number17
Early online date29 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Sep 2018

Keywords

  • interval training
  • intermittent exercise
  • enjoyment
  • adherence

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