Comparison of random and SSR-enriched shotgun pyrosequencing for microsatellite discovery and single multiplex PCR optimization in Acacia harpophylla F. Muell. Ex Benth

Olivier Lepais, Cecile F E Bacles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract / Description of output

Streamlining the development and genotyping of microsatellites in species for which no genetic information is available represents an important technical challenge to overcome in order to enable mainstream application of state-of-the-art population genetic analysis techniques in nonmodel organisms. Using the example of Acacia harpophylla, an acacia tree endemic of north-eastern Australia, we show that high-throughput shotgun pyrosequencing technology, so-called second-generation sequencing, reduces time and cost of microsatellite marker discovery in nonmodel organisms and of their large-scale typing in natural populations. We found that 0.5% of short sequence reads generated on 454 Genome Sequencer FLX Titanium from random genome sampling and 2.2% of reads generated with prior microsatellite enrichment yielded microsatellite markers with designed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers, suggesting that enrichment increases efficiency of pyrosequencing when microsatellite discovery is the primary goal. Using stringent selection criteria to facilitate downstream PCR multiplex design, we identified 1435 microsatellite loci with designed primers from a total of 200,908 short sequence reads. From a subset of 96 loci tested for amplification, 38 were validated for population genetics applications, leading to the optimization of a cost-effective multiplex PCR protocol for the simultaneous typing of nine microsatellites in natural populations of A. harpophylla.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)711-24
Number of pages14
JournalMolecular Ecology Resources
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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