Connectionist modelling of surface dyslexia based on foveal splitting: Impaired pronunciation after only two half pints

RC Shillcock, Padraic Monaghan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract / Description of output

In cases of surface dyslexia and phonological dyslexia there is a dissociation between the reading of irregular words and nonwords. This dissociation has been captured in connectionist models of dyslexia in terms of impairments to the models’ phonological representations. We report a series of connectionist simulations based on an alternative neuro-anatomically motivated theory that dyslexia is at least partly caused by hemispheric desynchronisation. Problems of interhemispheric transfer affect the mapping between orthography and phonology because the human fovea is precisely vertically split: a fixated word is initially split and the two parts contralaterally projected to the two hemispheres of the brain. Much of lexical processing can be reconstrued as the integration of this information (Shillcock, Ellison & Monaghan, 2000). We demonstrate that the dissociation between the reading of irregular words and nonwords can be understood in terms of a failure to integrate the initially split input.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 23rd annual conference of the cognitive science society
Pages916-921
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Connectionist modelling of surface dyslexia based on foveal splitting: Impaired pronunciation after only two half pints'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this