Conservation genetics in the European Union - Biases, gaps and future directions

ConGRESS Consortium, Silvia Perez-Espona*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The importance of genetic diversity for the assessment and maintenance of biodiversity is widely recognised, although not yet explicitly incorporated into conservation decision making in many European Union Member States. A detailed assessment of 4311 genetic studies relevant for the conservation and management of European species revealed that research is extensive and, therefore, could be more effectively implemented in existing conservation programs. However, research was overly biased towards the study of species with an economic value or iconic status, with research on threatened species or species with undetermined conservation status being scarce. The largest volume of research focused on species identification and relationships, population subdivision and dispersal; with microsatellite and mtDNA sequences as the most widely used markers. These results emphasize the need for further collaboration between researchers and conservation stakeholders to devise genetics research programs that can provide effective solutions for species conservation in Europe. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-136
Number of pages7
JournalBiological conservation
Volume209
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Biodiversity
  • Conservation biology
  • Environmental policy
  • Genetic markers
  • Management
  • Threatened species
  • BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION
  • TAXONOMIC BIAS
  • DNA BARCODES
  • SCIENCE
  • EVOLUTION
  • BIOLOGY
  • ECOLOGY
  • POLICY
  • CHALLENGES
  • DIVERSITY

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