Coping with stress across the lifespan: Absolute vs. relative changes in strategy

James Amirkhan*, Bonnie Auyeung

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Developmental theories presume dramatic differences in the coping of the young and old, but with little empirical support. In this study, five demographically matched groups: Pre-Teens (9-12 years, n = 153), Early Teens (13-15, n = 14 1), Late Teens (16-18, n = 15 1), Younger Adults (20-29, it = 133), and Older Adults (30-70, n = 133) completed child-friendly Coping Strategy Indicators, in reference to personal problems. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed all age groups use the same types of coping. However, groups differed in their preferences among these types, exhibiting general increases in Problem Solving and declines in Avoidance with age. This pattern held within problem-type, suggesting that it cannot be explained by differences in the stressors experienced. Implications for future research and assessment are discussed. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-317
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of applied developmental psychology
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • CHILDREN
  • stress
  • PATTERNS
  • children
  • PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
  • INDICATOR
  • AGE-DIFFERENCES
  • coping
  • YOUNG ADOLESCENTS
  • COMMON PROBLEMS
  • GENDER
  • adolescents
  • adults
  • CHILDHOOD
  • DEVELOPMENTAL-CHANGES
  • lifespan

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Coping with stress across the lifespan: Absolute vs. relative changes in strategy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this