Correlation of minimally invasive imaging techniques to assess intestinal mucosal perfusion with established markers of canine chronic inflammatory enteropathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Minimally-invasive diagnostic imaging techniques to detect canine intestinal inflammation are lacking. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and endoscopic narrow band imaging (NBI)-like endoscopy (called SPIES) might allow quantification of intestinal mucosal perfusion and microvessel density in canine chronic inflammatory enteropathy (CIE).
Hypothesis/objectives: Markers of mucosal perfusion as determined by CEUS and SPIES endoscopy are potentially useful diagnostic markers that help characterize CIE and correlate with histological inflammation type and severity.
Animals: Thirty client-owned dogs diagnosed with CIE at a referral hospital were prospectively included.
Material and methods: Data from CEUS, SPIES and white light (WL) endoscopy were correlated with WSAVA endoscopy/ histology scores and vessel density as determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for von Willebrand factor (vWF). Automated linear modeling was used to determine predictors of endoscopic and histologic severity.
Results: Duodenal histology correlated with SPIES data (area % value, rho = 0.424, p = 0.044). WL parameters correlated with SPIES parameters in the duodenum. Colonic histology correlated positively with CEUS, while colonic CEUS parameters correlated inversely with vWF expression. Several duodenal parameters combined predicted duodenal histology scores to a level of 73.4%. For the colon, two parameters contributed more than others to 73.1%.
Conclusion and clinical importance: Minimally invasive CEUS and SPIES appear feasible to assess intestinal perfusion in canine CIE. SPIES endoscopy may be a promising ancillary tool in assessing small intestinal inflammation, while CEUS could be used to assess colonic perfusion and inflammation. Both techniques need to be investigated further for their clinical utility.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Dec 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Correlation of minimally invasive imaging techniques to assess intestinal mucosal perfusion with established markers of canine chronic inflammatory enteropathy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this